Fort Worth, TX Southern Hotel Blaze, Jan 1909

3 PERISH IN FT. WORTH HOTEL FIRE.

GALOSINE[sic] EXPLOSION STARTS BLAZE FROM WHICH RAILROAD MEN VAINLY TRY TO ESCAPE -- SEVEN BUILDINGS DAMAGED.

MANY PERSONS HURT.

Fort Worth, Tex., Jan. 26. -- Three men were cremated or suffocated, and another fatally burned here this morning in a fire which gutted the Southern hotel on Jones street, opposite the Santa Fe passenger station.
The explosion of a gasoline stove caused a conflagration, which heavily damaged six other buildings in the same block. All were frame, and the fire spread with rapidity.
The dead were railroad employes who were asleep in the hotel. The bodies were found near windows, where they were trying to escape. Several women employes of the hotel suffered slight burns.

The Victims.
Ambulances carried the victims to the hospital, where all were identified.
The dead:
MILAM HAMILTON, of Cleburne, Tex.
CHARLES BRYANT, of Fort Worth.
JOSEPH VAUGHN, of St. Louis.
The injured:
DR. BRYON G. PETTY, Hugo, Okla.
J. B. MANNING, Dallas.
W. S. STEGALL and wife.
MISS LOU ALEXANDER.
After the explosion only a few minutes elapsed until the hotel was entirely wrapped in flames. Efforts to awaken the sleeping men failed. The police fired revolvers as a last resort and it is believed this awoke them, but too late to save their lives.

Risked His Life.
J. B. MANNING of Dallas risked his life in dragging out the bodies of BRYANT and DR. PETTY. MANNING was forced to leap through a sheet of flame to safety, and fell, injuring a limb. MRS. W. S. STEGALL was ill in bed, and was forced to rush through flames. She is now near collapse.
Four persons saved their lives by jumping from the third story to the roof of an adjoining building, 15 feet below. VAUGHAN'S wife and two children arrived from St. Louis today to join him, but were not in the hotel at the time.
PETTY is still alive but is dying.

Block Fire Apparatus.
As the fire engines were making a run to the blaze, the crew of a street car stopped the car and ran to the burning building, leaving the car blocking all traffic. Fire engines and wagons were forced to stop and the firemen boarded the car and took it a block away before they were able to proceed.
CHARLES BRYANT'S body was identified by his sweetheart. HAMILTON worked for the Santa Fe, BRYANT and VAUGHAN for the Denver railroad.

San Antonio Light Texas 1909-01-26