Laredo, TX Tornado Damages Much Of City, Apr 1905

Tornado damage Tornado damage Bridge ruined by tornado

TWENTY-ONE KILLED BY TORNADO IN TEXAS.

STORM FROM MEXICO WRECKS BIG BUILDINGS AT LAREDO.

ROOF RIPPED OFF HOSPITAL.

TEACHERS AT SEMINARY HAVE NARROW ESCAPE -- STUDENTS RESCUE ONE -- GOVERNOR APPEALS FOR AID.

Laredo, Texas, via Bermuda, Texas, April 29. -- Twenty-one persons were killed and scores injured in Laredo and in New Laredo by a tornado which tore through the city late last night, crossing the Rio Grande. Rumors of others killed in places outside Laredo lack confirmation. The property damage is large.
Four members of a GUERRERO family employed on the ranch of GEORGE WOODMAN, were crushed to death by the falling of the heavy walls of an adobe house which they occupied. The others were killed in a similar manner.
At Laredo Seminary not oneof the group of buildings escaped damage. The barracks, the primary buildings, Emery Hall, and the chapel were damaged from 50 to 75 per cent. The teachers narrowly escaped death, as the walls of some of the buildings which they occupied were demolished. MRS. EASLEY was rescued by several young students, who lowered her by a rope from a second story. She was severely bruised.
The roof of the Mexican National Hospital was lifted. A trip through the town fails to show a block that has not suffered. Trees, fences, telegraph and telephone poles, corrugated roofs, chimneys and walls, and debris of all kinds strew the streets.
The city authorities set out at once to clear away the wreckage of the storm, and to-night the city began to assume its customary appearance. Linemen are endeavoring to straighten out the tangle of wires, and it is believed that within two days the electric light service can be resumed. It is hoped to re-establish telegraphic communication, at least partly, within two days.
Conditions in New Laredo, across the Rio Grande, are similar to those on this side. It is not definitely known how many dead or injured there are in New Laredo, but a city officer to-night said there were few dead. The five known added to the list on this side would bring the number in both cities up to twenty-one.
The storm made its appearance from the Southwest in the neighborhood of Lampasas, Mexico, seventy-two miles from Laredo. Great havoc was wrought there, althought it is not though that any loss of life resulted.
When the storm struck Laredo the huts occupied by the poorer classes were razed and, as the wind increased, the more substantial buildings were unroofed and in many cases demolished.
Lightning flashed vividly and continuously, adding to the fears of the people. The storm lasted about one hour.
The Mexican National Railroad abandoned its service temporarily on account of lack of telegraph wires for the dispatching of trains. Physicians are busy attending to the wounded, and it is thought that all the injured will recover. DR. H. J. HAMILTON of the United States Marine Hospital Service placed 150 tents, with bedding, at the disposal of the homeless.

The New York Times New York 1905-04-30

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TWENTY-ONE DIE IN TEXAS STORM.

FRIGHTFUL TORNADO CARRIES DEATH AND LOSS INTO LAREDO.

SCORES WERE INJURED, AND THERE ARE STORIES OF MORE KILLED IN OTHER PLACES.

Property Damage Is Enormous -- The Laredo Seminary Utterly Destroyed, But Students and Teachers Miraculously Escaped -- Mayor SANCHEZ Appeals For Aid.

Laredo, Tex., April 29 -- (Via Bermuda, Tex.) -- Sixteen people were killed and scores injured in Laredo by a tornado which tore through the city late last night. Rumors of others killed in places outside Laredo are heard, but as yet lack confirmation. The property damage is large. So far as known the names of the dead in Laredo are:
JUAN GUERRERO, aged forty-six.
JULIA GUERRERO, aged eighteen.
PANEILA GUERRERO, aged twenty-two.
_______ GUERRERO, missing.
Unknown Man, servant Laredo seminary.
PALALIO NUNCIO, aged fifty-six.
JUNIATA JARAMILLA, aged thirteen.
Unknown Man, employed in the Bruno hotel.
S. MUNOZ, aged fifty.
Three Members of a Family Named TREIO.
One Woman and Two Boys, aged eight and nine years, respectively, named BARRERA.
MISS GAYETAN, aged seventeen.
The four first mentioned in the list were members of one family and were employed on the ranch of GEORGE WOODMAN. They were all crushed to death by the falling in of the heavy walls of the adobe house which they occupied. The others mentioned in the list met their fate in a like manner. The damage wrought at the Larado seminary is severe. Not one of the group of magnificent buildings which go to make up that institution escaped damage. The barracks, the primary building, Emery hall and the chapel were damaged from 50 to 75 per cent. The escape from death of the teachers at present quartered in the institution is considered miraculous as the walls of some of the buildings which they occupied were completely demolished. MRS. EARLY, one of the teachers was heroically rescued by several young cadets, students of the institution, they lowering her by a rope from a second story. She was badly bruised.
The Mexican National hospital building had the roof lifted from the edifice and it will require much time to repair the building for patients. A trip through the town fails to show a locality that has not suffered more or less from the storm. Trees, fences, telegraph and telephone poles, corrugated roofs, chimneys and walls and debris of all imaginable kinds strew the streets.
The city authorities are at work cleaning away the wreckage of the storm, and to-night the city began to assume its customary tranquil appearance.
Conditions in New Laredo, across the Rio Grande river, are similar to those existing on this side. It is not officially known how many dead or injured there are but a city official of that place tonight stated there are five dead that he knew of. The five known dead added to the list of dead on this side of the river would bring the number of dead in both cities up to twenty-one persons.
DR. H. J. HAMILTON, of the United States marine hospital service, has placed 150 tents with bedding, etc., at the disposal of the homeless.

The Fort Wayne Journal Gazette Indiana 1905-04-30

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