Off Seven Islands, QB Steamer ST. OLAF Sinks In St. Lawrence River, Nov 1900

LOST WITH ALL ON BOARD.

STEAMER ST. OLAF, PLYING BETWEEN QUEBEC AND ESQUIMEAUX POINT, WRECKED OFF SEVEN ISLANDS.

Quebec, Nov. 24. -- News reached here early this afternoon that the steamer ST. OLAF, which has been coasting between this port and Esquimeaux Point, in the Lower St. Lawrence, for the last two years, had become a total wreck off Seven Islands, and that her passengers and crew had been lost. Capt. LEMAISTIE, in command of the steamer, and several of his officers and crew belonged to this city. The first dispatch from Seven Islands brought but very meagre news, and it was only late in the afternoon that A. FRAZER & Co., owners of the steamer, were informed of the extent of the disaster. Besides the nineteen men of the steamer's crew, it is learned that seven passengers also perished.
The ST. OLAF was as iron steamer of 305 tons, and was built on the Clyde at Port Glasgow in 1882. She was valued at about $40,000 and insured for about $20,000.
Before coming to this port she ran between Pictou and Magdalen Islands, and was chartered by FRAZER & Co. to replace the steamship OTTER, wrecked on a trip to Quebec about two years ago. The ST. OLAF left here on Sunday morning last on the trip to Esquimeaux Point, carrying Government mails, passengers, and a large cargo. All went apparently well on the way down, and the steamer started on her return trip to this port. The last news heard of the ST. OLAF up to this morning was that she had left Sheldrake on Wednesday afternoon. Shortly after this the signal station dispatches reported rough weather with gales of wind and snow, and it is supposed that during one of these gales the ST. OLAF ran ashore on one of the rocks at the entrance of the Seven Islands, as the dispatch states that she was was wrecked on Boule Island.
Capt. LEMAISTRE was well and favorably known as a careful and skillful coast navigator.
The officers and crew of the ST. OLAF were:
P. T. LEMAISTRE, Captain.
LOUIS CARON, first mate.
CHARLES BOUDREAU, second mate.
F. T. VEIT, purser.
JOSEPH TREMBLAY, steward.
JOSEPH ROY, cook.
ART LAMARIE, seaman.
JOSEPH GAUTHIER, seaman.
SAMUEL DOYLE, seaman.
WILLIAM BLAINEY, seaman.
AMEDEE VIGNEAUTT, lamp trimmer.
JOSEPH ARSENEAU, cabin boy.
GUS LAFLEUR, messroom boy.
EUGENE BELANGER, chief engineer.
JAMES BRUNELL, second engineer.
WILFRED BELANGER, third engineer.
ODILON CORMIER, fireman.
JOHN GAGNE, fireman.
THOMAS DOYLE, fireman.
The passengers were:
LOUIS GAGNEN of Pentecost.
JOSEPH BACON of Sheldrake.
CLARENCE BOND of Sheldrake.
JEREMIE CHINIC, of Sheldrake.
MICHAEL MAHAR, of Sheldrake.
NAPOLEON BEAUDIN, of St. John's River.
MISS MARIE PAGE, of Thunder River.
The body of MISS PAGE has been found.
News was received here to-night that the ST. OLAF is lying on the rock, and at low tide two feet of her hull can be seen out of water. The residents of Seven Islands are searching the shores for bodies, but had not returned up to 8 o'clock this evening. The place where the steamer was wrecked is about seven miles off Seven Islands and about 300 miles from this port.

The New York Times New York 1900-11-25

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