Warrior Ridge, PA Train Wreck, Feb 1912

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STEEL CARS SAVE MANY IN WRECK.

EXPERTS STUDY PENNSYLVANIA LIMITED ACCIDENT.

ONLY THREE OF 102 KILLED.

SEVEN PULLMAN CARS PLUNGE DOWN THIRTY FEET EMBANKMENT -- SIXTY-SEVEN ARE INJURED -- OFFICIAL BLAMES BROKEN BAR UNDER ENGINE -- ONLY WOODEN CAR STAYS ON TRACK.

Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 16. -- Experts are making an investigation of the wreck of the Pennsylvania Limited eastbound train at Warrior Ridge, four miles west of Huntingdon. Their report is expected to show that the steel cars prevented a greater loss of life.
A dining car and eight steel Pullman sleeping cars left the track and plunged down a thirty foot embankment to the edge of the Juniata River.
Of the 102 persons aboard three were killed and sixty-seven injured, several of these seriously. Thirty or more of the injured were taken to the Blair Memorial Hospital at Huntingdon, where they were cared for by the local staff, supplemented by a corps of surgeons and nurses from Harrisburg and Altoona.
Following is a list of the dead:
HARRY A. NAUSS, New York City.
MRS. J. F. TAVENNER, Cordova, Ill.
MRS. MARY HALL, colored, matron on Pullman car.
The list of injured includes:
G. A. YEATTS, president of Fiske University of Nashville.
DR. and MRS. J. L. YEATTS, the latter a sister of Dr. John Finney of Baltimore.
DR. EDWARD LEONARD of New York.
DR. and MRS. W. G. WHITE of Pittsburgh.
The wrecked train, though behind time, was running at only ordinary speed. when as it passed between the end of the mountain at Warrior Ridge and the river the two locomotives and a combination and mail car parted from the remainder of the train, consisting of a dining car, eight Pullman sleepers and an observation car, all of steel. All except the observation car left the track and went over the bank, turning on their sides toward the water. The observation car toppled slightly, but did not go over. The locomotives and combination car kept the track, running several hundred yards before they could be stopped.
C. A. Preston, superintendent of the middle division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, reported officially to the state railroad commission that the wreck was caused by the breaking of an arch bar under the front truck of the locomotive nearest the train.
The wreck is likely to be carefully studied by experts, as it is the first big smashup of a modern all steel train. It is certain the showing will be distinctly favorable to the steel vestibule type of construction.

Middletown Daily Times-Press New York 1912-02-16