Cape Lincoln, OR Steamer BROTHER JONATHAN Disaster, Aug 1865

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WRECK OF THE STEAMSHIP BROTHER JONATHAN.

SHE IS LOST ON THE VOYAGE FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO OREGON.

SHE STRIKES ON A SUNKEN ROCK AND SINKS IN AN HOUR.

REPORTED LOSS OF NEARLY ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY LIVES.

ONLY SIXTEEN PERSONS KNOWN TO BE SAVED.

The interruption of telegraphic communication with the Pacific coast during the last few weeks may account for the fact that we have not recieved any intimation of the fearful calamity recorded below. These particulars we find in the San Francisco Steamer Bulletin of Aug. 3. That paper says:
The brief telegram in the morning papers, announcing the wreck of the steamer BROTHER JONATHAN, and the loss of nearly all on board, cast a gloom over the community and created the most intense anxiety among those of our citizens having relations or friends on board. The meagre and unsatisfactory character of the dispatch, while it increased the public anxiety, at the same time, from its entire lack of details, afforded grounds for hope that the general fact may have been exaggerated, and that the loss of life will not turn out to be so great as reported. Unless there was a very heavy sea at the scene of disaster, it seems hardly possible that only 16 persons out of 162 passengers and crew, should have been saved -- especially as the wreck is reported to have occurred at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and the passengers had an hour in which to save themselves after being notified of the danger. It is also remarkable that a courier should have been dispatched from Cape Lincoln to Jacksonville, whence the dispatch was sent to COL. DRUM, stating that sixteen passengers only were saved, and at the same time omitting to mention any of their names.
The BROTHER JONATHAN was provided with three large surf-boats and three of Francis' patent life-boats, so that it is not improbable that more of the passengers have been saved than we know of now. The coast in the vicinity of the accident is exceedingly rocky, and the feat of landing in a boat is a dangerous one at any time. It is not unlikely that one or more boats from the steamer might have put off from the shore with the hope of reaching Crescent City, which is only about ten miles distant, in which case we should not have received tidings from them as soon as from the others who landed in the vicinity of the wreck.
Jacksonville is but sixty miles from the scene of the wreck, and the public will probably have to wait till another courier is dispatched from Cape Lincoln before they will learn any further particulars. We have been unable, up to the time of going to press, to get any additional telegrams from Jacksonville relating to the calamity. The official dispatch to COL. DRUM, on which the morning telegram was based, arrived late last evening, and is as follows:
Cape Lincoln, via Jacksonville, Oregon,
July 31, 1865 -- Received at San Francisco, Aug. 1, 1865, at 10 P.M.

To COL. R. C. DRUM:
At 3 P.M. yesterday, the steamer BROTHER JONATHAN struck a sunken rock, and sunk in less than an hour, with all on board, except 16 persons, who escaped in a small boat, the only survivors of the ill-fated ship. No trace of the vessel is left. I was out last night on the beach with 14 men; shall keep a party out on the beach. GEN. WRIGHT, family and staff are supposed to be lost. Full particulars by mail.
THOMAS BUCKLEY.
Captain Sixth Infantry, C.V., Commanding.

As will be seen by the above telegram the disaster occurred on Sunday afternoon.
Cape Lincoln is situated about six miles from Crescent City, and four miles from the coast, where the wreck occurred.
The BROTHER JONATHAN left San Francisco on Friday morning last, at 10 o'clock, bound for Portland, Oregon, and thence to Victoria, Vancouver's Island. She is one of the California Steam Navigation Company's regular steamers, plying between these points, and was built, or rebuilt, in this city two years since. She was considered a staunch boat. Her crew, including officers, consisted of 54 men. The number of passengers on board, including, children, was 109; at least this is the number registered at the company's office in this city, but it usually happens that several passengers go on board at the last moment, and their names are not registered at the office. The following is a complete list of the passengers and crew so far as known:

Passengers:
BRIG. GEN. WRIGHT, U.S.A., and Wife.
LIEUT. E. D. WAITE, U.S.A..
MISS MARY BERRY.
S. MEYER.
DAVID McHARDLE.
A. L. STYLES and Wife.
WM. LOGAN and servant.
JAMES NISBET.
JAMES E. TRITES.
M. CRAWFORD.
T. DAWSON.
MISS MARY PLACE.
MRS. STACKPOLE, infant and child.
J. WEIL.
MRS. ANNIE CRAIG.
MRS. LEE and infant.
GOV. A. C. HENRY.
L. G. TUTTLE.
B. H. STONE, wife and infant.
CAPT. CHADDOCK, U.S.R.S.
MRS. JOHN C. KEENAN and 7 ladies.
S. N. LUCKEY, wife and child.
MISS FORBES.
A. A. STONE, wife and infant.
CHARLES H. BELDEN.
ALBERT MICKLET.
GEO. WEDEKIND.
JOS. BERTON.
THOMAS MOYLE and wife.
ROBERT M. FRAZER.
JOHN R. CRAIG.
WILLIAM BILLINISKI.
J. S. BINN.
MRS. WOODLOCK.
CONRAD ADAMS.
FREDERICK A. POUND.
GILMAN CLINDMAN.
JAMES LYNCH.
G. CARRELL.
MOSES BERTIER.
P. LEFFER.
A. INGRAHAM, M.D., U.S.A.
JAMES R. RICHARDS.
MISS E. P. SNOW.
JAMES CONNELL.
J. G. GAY and wife.
MISS N. SHIRSER.
M. L. HEFRON.
GEORGE W. POLLOCK.
CHARLES C. NORTHROP.
J. C. HUNSACKER.
MRS. N. C. BROOKS.
MISS HEMSLEY.
WM. LOGAN and wife.
D. CRANDALL.
VICTOR SMITH.
MRS. C. FOUNTAIN, daughter and child.
D. C. ROWELL, wife and 4 children.
MRS. J. STANFORD.
MRS. JANE CHURCH (colored).
MRS. WENDELL and child, (colored).
J. S. GEDDES.
B. MATHEWSON.
MRS. LUCKEY and 2 children.
MAJ. E. W. EDDY, U.S.A.
JOS. ORSELLI.
H. DEFIRNIE.
S. B. MORGAN.
GEO. W. ANNIS.
J. B. STRONG.
S. P. CRAIG.
MARY A. TWEEDLE.
PATRICK DWYER.
JOHN ADAMS.
Two Indians.
R. S. MANLY.
HENRY ABRAMS.
THOMAS GULLAN.
C. BISNER.
Wells Fargo & Co.'s Express Messenger.

Crew of the "BROTHER JONATHAN."
S. J. DeWOLFE, Commander; W. A. H. ALLEN, 1st officer; J. D. CAMPBELL, 2d officer; JAMES PATTERSON, 3d officer; JOHN S. BENTON, purser; ALBERT DYER, freight clerk; ELIJAH MOTT, chief engineer; G. WHITE, 1st assistant engineer; J. FRANCIS, 2d assistant engineer; WM. ANDERSON, oiler; PATRICK LYNN, fireman; A. COLLENBURG, fireman; FREDERICK MALERS, fireman; ARTHUR HARVEY, fireman; WILLIAM LOWERY, fireman; JOHN GORMAN, coal passer; JOHN HILTON, coal passer; JOHN CLINTON, coal passer; JAMES PERKINS, seaman; JACOB YATES, seaman; JOSEPH L. GOMEZ, seaman; HENRY WALKER, seaman; J. THOMPSON, fireman; G. FREDERICK, seaman; A. GONZELS, seaman; WILLIAM PENN, seaman; L. DOMINGO, seaman; J. SILVA, seaman; WILLIAM FOSTER, seaman; FREDERICK S. DOUGLAS, seaman; JAMES FOWLER, seaman; D. DEAS, 2d pantryman; THOMAS TIERNEY, porter; HENRY MILLER, baker; EDWARD SHIELDS, waiter; CHARLES RICE, waiter; MANUEL HERRLIA, waiter; C. F. LAUREND, watchman; RICHARD DAULTON, steward; H. G. BROWN, 2d steward; JOHN MILLER, pantryman; CHAS. LAWS, cook; JAMES LAWS, 2d cook; HENRY LEE, 3d cook; C. STEVENSON, stewardress; JOHN T. HUTTON, cabin boy; ARMAND LEE, cabin boy; EDWARD FRANKLIN, cabin boy; LEWIS JOHNSON, cabin boy; JOHN E. POSTER, cabin boy; MATEO SALINAS, cabin boy; DAVID FARRELL, cabin boy; STEPHEN MORAN, cabin boy; JOHN W. WELCH, cabin boy.

The BROTHER JONATHAN carried a valuable cargo, on which there were insurances in San Francisco offices as follows:
California Insurance Company -- $20,000.
California Lloyds -- $13,690.
Merchants Mutual -- $10,000.
Bigelow Bros. -- $2,600.
Falkner, Bell & Co. -- $2,300.
Total -- $48,490.
Probably two thirds of the cargo was uninsured.

The New York Times New York 1865-08-26