Bay of Fundy, NS Steamer CITY OF MONTICELLO Sinking, Nov 1900

NOVA SCOTIA City of Monticello 2.jpg NOVA SCOTIA City of Monticello.jpg

SIXTY-THREE LIVES LOST.

A STEAMER SINKS AND MANY PASSENGERS DROWN.

THREE PERSONS ARE SAVED.

CITY OF MONTICELLO STRUCK BY HURRICANE ON DANGEROUS COAST -- DARING FRANTIC SCRAMBLE FOR BOATS WOMEN AND CHILDREN DROWN -- PARTIAL LIST OF DEAD.

Halifax, Nov. 12. -- The steamer City of Monticello belonging to the Yarmouth Steamship Company, has foundered in the Bay of Fundy with an appalling loss of life. Of the crew and passengers of the ill-fated steamship sixty-three persons are reported to have perished in the wreck. Some of the bodies have already been washed ashore. Captain HARDING, in command of the City of Monticello, was among those who succeeded in reaching the shore. Among those who perished it is reported, were many women and children. When the terrific hurricane struck the steamer she was in the Bay of Fundy. Great seas were huried over her and in a short time she became unmanageable. Soon she started her timbers and began leaking. The water gained fast and when it was decided to take to the boats a frantic scramble between the crew and passengers began. Some were washed overboard. Some lost their lives by the overturning of small boats. Others went down with the steamer. She sank off Cape Forchie. The City of Monticello ran between Yarmouth and Halifax, which is 140 miles from the home port. She hails from Glasgow and was built at the yards of the Harlan & Hollingsworth Company, Wilmington, Del., in 1866. She was formerly the City of Norfolk. Her registered gross tonage is 1,084.
The place where the Monticello struck is at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy, where the waters of the bay join those of the Atlantic. There are many reefs and shoals at this spot and the currents are many and changeable, it being one of the most dangerous places on the coast. The gale last night kicked up a tremendous sea and at the time the vessel struck the waves were sending spray for hundreds of feet over the land. Practically all the deckhands and the remainder of the crew belonged along the shore between Yarmouth and Lockport and many of them leave widows and children. The Monticello carried a crew out of proportion to her size, as they handled all freight themselves and made frequent calls at intermediate points, both day and night.
The officers and men on the Monticello were:
T. M. HARDING, captain.
H. D. NEWELL, first officer, of Sable Island.
N. MURPHY, second officer, Yarmouth, N.S.
JAMES FLEMMING, third officer, Port Clyde, N.S.
B. M. HILTON, purser, Yarmouth, N.S.
CHARLES GREIG, chief engineer, Halifax.
HERBERT POOLE, second engineer.
WYNNE RINGER, oiler, Yarmouth.
ROBERT DOUCETTE, oiler, Yarmouth.
JAMES COLE, fireman, Yarmouth.
SAMUEL GLOUCESTER, fireman, Lockport, N.S.
SWEN JOHNSON, seaman, Yarmouth.

Continued on Page 2.