Rochester, NY Tornado and Storm Damage, June 1846

CHILDREN KILLED AT ROCHESTER.

An accident of the most harrowing kind occurred at Rochester, in this state, on Friday last. We give the particulars as follows:

From the Rochester Democrat of Saturday.
Fearful Accident. -- Many of our citizens were startled, yesterday, about 11 1/2 o'clock, with the rumor that school house No. 9, (situated on Parker street, north east part of the city,) had been struck by lightning, and four or five children killed. But on proceeding to the house, we found that the roof had been blown off, and the brick gable and chimneys driven into the female department.
That department contained about 100 children, under the direction of MISS GOULD; and the brick and timbers fell in all parts of the school, injuring, more or less, nearly all the children but killing none.
The following are the names of the children injured, so far as could be ascertained:
Daughter of WILLIAM WALLACE, leg broken.
Son of WM. FINLEY, badly bruised.
TIMOTHY FITZGERALD had a daughter badly bruised.
SAMUEL HUGHES, two daughters, bruised.
PHILIP PRIOR, two.
PATRICK FLEMING, one.
RICHARD STORY, two.
JOSEPH COCHRANE, two.
PATRICK ANDERSON, two (one badly).
JAS. BUCKLY, two (one badly).
CHARLES BUCKLY, one.
MESSRS. DOYLE, McDONALD, CHAFFREY, DOOLAN, SHEAHAN, BURNS, CATON, MORROW, KEFER, COSTIGAN and DAVIS, each one.
MESSRS. BISHOP and SOMERVILLE, each two.
The whole number of children reported to be injured is 34, all but three or four of whom it is expected will recover.
The storm was not violent in the city; but in the immediate neighborhood it appears to have been a tornado.
WHen the first crash was heard, many of the little ones crawled under the desks and benches, and so escaped material injury. Others were sitting directly in the (apparently) most dangerous position, and escaped without a scratch.
MISS GOULD endeavored to open the door, after the disaster, but could not, and she labored heroically in extricating the children until assistance came. She naturally feels grieved at the misfortune; but no blame can attach to her.
The boys' department was uninjured, except in the roof, andin about two feet square of the ceiling -- which was broken through by the timbers and bricks.
Masses of the roof were carried 200 yards, and the heaviest portions 20 or 30 feet. We should think that the building was slightly put up.
Many trees in the vicinity were blown down; and we infer that the fury of the tornado swept over that part of the town. It is almost a miracle that a score of the children in the school house were not killed.
The storm produced some damage in other respects. The rain fell in torrents, and nearly filled up many of the cellars on Main and Buffalo streeets. Many fruit trees were blown down, and two or three unfinished buildings were partly demolished.
Many of the posts of the Telegraph were blown down, and the line was not in operation the ramainder of the day.
Sheep Killed. -- Ten sheep, belonging to MR. HOYT, on the farm of OLIVER CULVER, in Irondequoit, were killed during the storm yesterday.

The Brooklyn Eagle New York 1846-06-22