Corning (Gibson), NY Train Wreck, Jul 1912

Birth, Marriage & Death Records

Corning NY (Gibson) Train Wreck, July 4 191 Corning NY (Gibson) Train Wreck, July 4 1912 Corning NY (Gibson) Train Wreck, July 4 191 Removing the Debris Corning NY (Gibson) Train Wreck, July 4 191

FATAL COLLISION

EXPRESS TELESCOPES LACKAWANNA TRAIN FILLED WITH EXCURSIONISTS AT CORNING.

VICTIMS KILLED IN SLEEP

Elmira and Corning Hospitals Overcrowded with Victims, Many of Whom Were on Their Way to Niagara Falls.

Corning, N. Y., July 5. -- Westbound Lackawanna passenger train No. 9, from New York, composed of two engines, a baggage car, three Pullmans and two day cars, in the order named, was demolished at Gibson, three miles east of Corning, at 5:25 o'clock a. m.
More than forty persons were killed and between fifty and sixty persons were injured. Many of the victims were holiday excursionists bound to Niagara Falls, who had boarded the train at points along the Lackawanna line.
The wreck was the worst in the history of the road. Its cause, according to WILLIAM SCHROEDER, engineer of the express, was his failure to see the signals set against his train. The morning was foggy and he said he couldn't make out the signals.
The wrecked train stood on the main track blocked by extra freight train No. 61, which had become crippled. There was no flag out, according to SCHROEDER. The signals which SCHROEDER declared it was too foggy to see were just around the curve. The flying express plunged past them and crashed into the rear of No. 9, bringing death to more than two-score of its passengers.

Identified Dead.
Following is a list of the dead who have been identified:
ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM A., Hokoben[sic], N. J.
BRANDIES, MR. AND MRS. CHARLES, New York City, on their wedding trip.
DUAK, HERMAN, Newark.
ERWIN, MRS. C. E., Chicago.
FETODUCATI, MRS. LUCY, New York City.
HESS, MRS. EDITH A., Scranton, Pa.
IVEY, DR. E. V., of Bellevue Hospital, New York, home, Suffolk, Va.
JONES, MRS. ANNA HILL, Scranton, Pa.
LAIRD, GEORGE, Brooklyn.
LAIRD, MRS. WILLIAM R., Brooklyn.
LAIRD, PHILIP, two years old, Brooklyn.
LAIRD, MABEL, five years old, Brooklyn.
LOWERY, EVELYN, negress, Newark.
NOVAK, ANTONIO, Scranton.
NELSON, ANTON, Jersey City.
PRATT, F. C., Buffalo, traveling salesman.
PATOUSKI, M., immigrant, ticketed to Buffalo.
PRAVELOWSKI, REGINA P., Russia.
REYNOLDS, MRS. LILLIAN, Brooklyn.
SMITH, JAMES, negro, Pullman porter, Newark.
SCHULTZ, ERNEST, Buffalo.
ZIMMER, MR. AND MRS. J., Scrantan[sic].

Of the injured, four of the unidentified died in the Corning Hospital. Several have nothing about their persons by means of which they could be identified.
Eleven persons are being cared for in St. Joseph's Hospital in Elmira, while the others are in the Corning Hospital.
There are eight women, three men with no identifying marks. There are a girl five years old, a woman with gold pin marked "F.G.A., 1909" and ring marked "L.B." a girl three years old, a baby 16 months, a woman with gold pin marked "P.J." a man 28 years old with ring marked "M.G. To F.P., '91."
Trainmen say that this loss of life was caused by the carelessness of the engineer of the express train who ran at a terrific speed past a frantically signalling[sic] flagman and the warning of a dropped semaphore arm.
The dead, which filled to overflowing the morgues of the little town are in many instances so mangled that identification is almost impossible. The engine of the express train ripped its way through the two day coaches in the rear, killing instantly everyone in them, plowed on through half of a steel Pullman, throwing the sleeping car off the track, and then came to a standstill.

Ogdensburg Advance and St. Lawrence Weekly Democrat 1912-07-11

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