New York City, NY Steamer ST. PAUL Accident, Dec 1895

KILLED BY STEAM.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT ON BOARD THE NEW STEAMER ST. PAUL.

SEVEN OF THE CREW DEAD.

PIPE BURSTS SUDDENLY WHILE MEN ARE WORKING NEAR BY.

STEAMER WILL BE DELAYED.

REPAIRS WILL OCCUPY SEVERAL DAYS -- HER MAILS TO BE FORWARDED ON ANOTHER BOAT.

New York, Dec. 18. -- Seven men were killed and four injured this morning by the explosion of a steam pipe on the American line steamship St. Paul, while the vessel lay at her dock at the foot of Fulton Street, North River.
The dead are:
JAMES FAUNS, assistant engineer, of England.
______ MANNING, fourth assistant engineer.
ROBERT CAMPBELL, machinist, New York.
GEORGE WILLIAMS, machinist, Hoboken.
DANIEL McCULLION, machinist's helper, Brooklyn.
ADOLPH FOLKER, cleaner, Scotland.
ROBERT WILSON.
The injured are:
FRANK VESPERS, third assistant engineer, Roxbury, Mass.
ANDREW HEARD, storekeeper, Scotland.
______ DUNHAM, machinist, England.
EDWARD WISCHERT, engineer.
All these were seriously scalded and taken to the Hudson Street Hospital. At the time of the accident, shortly after 7 a.m., there were thirty men of the crew in the fire room and ten in the engine room. Preparations were being made for the sailing of the vessel at 11 o'clock, but fortunately none of the passengers were aboard the vessel. The explosion was of terrific force and shook the big vessel from stem to stern. Following the report was the sound of escaping steam. It poured up to the deck from the engine room in clouds and completely enveloped the vicinity.
From above the noise of the escaping steam could be heard the cries of the men who had been at work in the engine room, injured by the explosion. The force of the explosion was such that it rendered access to the locality extremely difficult. As quickly as possible the steam was turned off. Almost simultaneously four half-dead men scrambled up the iron stairway and were lifted to the deck. Five men were found lying in various parts of the compartment, dead. FOLKER and WILSON died later in the hospital. They had been scalded horribly, their faces and those parts of the body, which were not covered by their clothing looked as if they had been parboiled. The force of the explosion was so great that it blew out a portion of the bulk head and shattered every particle of glass within a radius of fifty feet. On investigation it was found that the main steam pipe, at the bend near the bulkhead, had burst. The pipe is sixteen inches in diameter and extends from one end of the ship to the other. Superintendent Engineer Clark said he was sure the vessel could not sail within a week, for it would require at least that time to make the necessary repairs. The probable result of the injuries received by WILSON, VESPER and HEARD cannot be foretold by the surgeons. It is likely, however, that some of the men cannot survive.
The first fast steamship to sail from New York to Liverpool is the Campania, of the Cunard Line, and to her the United States mails now on the St. Paul will be transferred.

St. Paul Daily Globe Minnesota 1895-12-19