New York City, NY (Hudson River) Liner MUENCHEN Fire, Feb 1930

Muenchen.jpg Muenchen On Fire in New York City.jpg

LINER BURNS AND SINKS AT NEW YORK PIER.

FIREMEN FELLED BY FOUR BLASTS ABOARD GERMAN SHIP MUENCHEN.

PASSENGERS ARE SAFE.

ALL AVAILABLE APPARATUS IN CITY BATTLES FLAMES.

New York, Feb. 11 (AP) -- The North German Lloyd liner MUENCHEN burned and sank at her pier in the Hudson River today a short time after she had docked at the end of a voyage from Bremen.
The fire broke out in hold No. 6 aft in which part of the shellac was stored, a short time after the liner had docked. It quickly spread to hold No. 5, and the explosions followed.
Firemen who were on the pier shooting water into the hold were thrown off their feet by the force of the blasts. There were four explosions. As one of them occurred MRS. JOSEPHINE GEHRKE, 50, a stewardess still aboard the ship, was knocked down. She was treated in a waiting room on the pier for bruises and shock.
The passengers had all left the ship when the explosions occurred. Many of them, however, were still on the pier having their baggage examined by the customs men. They were ordered from the pier, and the ship was immediately cleared of its crew.
One person, a stewardess, was slightly injured when the force of one of the explosions knocked her down. The 263 passengers had left the ship before the explosions occurred, and the crew was immediately ordered ashore.
As great clouds of black smoke enveloped the waterfront, a fifth alarm was sent in calling out all the available fire fighting apparatus in New York City.

The North German Lloyd Liner MUENCHEN, which burned and sank today at her dock, made her maiden voyage to New York in July of 1923, being the first German ship since the war to enter the harbor. She was launched at Stettin, Germany, in the spring of the same year.
She was 551 feet long, 65 feet wide, 65 feet beam and with a gross tonnage of 14,000 feet. She had accommodations for 1,100 passengers.
Officials at the North German Lloyd Line offices today said they could not place an estimate on her value at this time.
In shipping circles the value of the liner was placed at between $2,500,000 and $3,000,000 without cargo. No estimate could be made of the value of her cargo.

Syracuse Herald New York 1930-02-11

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