New York City, NY Train Collision, Jan 1902

Birth, Marriage & Death Records

RAILROAD TRAINS COLLIDE IN A TUNNEL.

REPORT THAT TEN PEOPLE ARE KILLED.

AFTER THE COLLISION THE WRECK CAUGHT FIRE -- TOOK PLACE BETWEEN TWO TRAINS ON THE NEW YORK CENTRAL.

New York, Jan. 8. -- Two local trains bound for New York -- one from South Norwalk, the other from White Plains, crashed together in the smoke clouded Park Avenue tunnel of the New York Central line early today. Seventeen persons were killed and forty injured. Of the latter twelve were seriously injured. The engineer and fireman of the White Plain's local and a towerman were arrested. District Attorney Jerome visited the wreck and will possibly direct the investigation.
The list of dead is as follows:
E. F. WALTON, of No. 91 Manhattan Avenue, Rochelle Park, was a native of Philadelphia and was graduated from Haverford College, near that city, where he was prominent in athletics. He was thirty-one years old, six feet two inches tall. He was married seven years ago to Miss Wetherall, of Philadelphia.
H. G. DIMON, was a consulting engineer employed by the American Bridge Company. He was a brother in law of District Attorney J. Addison Young of Westchester County. With his wife and five small children Mr. Dimon lived at No. 103 Manhattan Avenue, Rochelle Park.
ALEXANDER M. PERRIN, of No. 41 Poplar Place, New Rochelle, secretary of the Union Bag and Paper Company. Before coming East, a year or two ago, Mr. Perrin lived in Evanston, a suburb of Chicago. He was a widower, forty-five years old. Two children survive him.
D. B. C. FOSKETT, was a Custom House inspector, and with his wife, boarded with Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Hinsdale at No. 9 Field Avenue, New Rochelle. Both he and Mr. Hinsdale were killed while riding to the city. Besides a widow, several children survive.
WILLIAM LEYS, was forty-eight years old. He was born in Scotland and come to this country when a young man. One of his sons is married and lives in Williamsbridge.
H. FRANKLIN CROSBY, twenty-one-years old, the son of Horace Crosby, a well known civil engineer of New Rochelle, was the only native ot that city to meet his death on the ill fated train.
OSCAR W. MYEROWITZ, an optician of this city, and was well known as a yachtsman. He was a member of the Reform Club. He occupied a handsome house at No. 6 Banker Place. A widow survives him.
Mr. Myerowitz lived in New Rochelle and was secretary of the New Rochelle Yacht Club.
THEODORE FAJARDO, was a native of Spain. He was employed in this city as a buyer for the Cuban importing house of A. M. Capen & Co. No. 69 Pearl Street. Four small children survive him.

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