New York City, NY Subway Collision, Apr 1929

THREE KILLED, FORTY HURT IN NEW YORK TRAIN WRECK.

MANY PERSONS ARE TRAMPLED DURING PANIC.

PASSENGERS THROWN INTO FRENZY WHEN FIRE BREAKS OUT FOLLOWING CRASH OF SUBWAY AND ELEVATED TRAINS BEARING OVER 2,000 WORKERS -- WILD EXCITEMENT PREVAILS AND RELIEF WORKERS ARE HAMPERED.

New York, April 28 -- (AP) -- A steel train and a wooden one, jammed with between 2,000 and 3,000 office workers, collided on the elevated structure just above the Yankee stadium today, killing three persons and injuring two score, half of them seriously.
Fire and panic followed the crash and for more than an hour police and firemen fought with frenzied men and women trampling each other in a wild scramble for safety.
The accident, a rear end collision, occurred at the 167th street station, where they subway trains emerge from their underground tunnels and run on the same overhead tracks as the elevated railroad trains.
The wooden train was an "L" train and the steel one a subway train. Both were southbound with every seat taken and the aisles filled with straphangers.
The fire hampered the work of rescue. Policemen carried the injured along the tracks to the station and firemen raised ladders to the "L" structure to bring the victims to the street level.
There was a panic after the crash. Many women were hurt in the struggle to extricate themselves from cars not directly smashed in the collision.
The elevated train had stopped on signal and the express train of all steel cars rammed it with terrific force.
J. CULLEN, motorman of the subway train and unidentified youth, who was standing near CULLEN'S booth were killed. An unidentified man, who was on the rear car of the "L" train also met death.
When police and firemen dug their way into the motorman's compartment of the subway train, using acetylene torches to burn away the twisted steel, they found CULLEN with his hand on the emergency brake and the motor set in reverse. He had realized the imminence of a collision but too late.
The body of the boy, who was identified as WILLIAM J. SCHULTZ, 17 of the Bronx, was found wedged near the motorman's compartment.
An hour after the collision stragglers were still trying to get out of the trains.
They told of the wildest excitement after the crash. The passengers were thrown into the aisles by the terrific impact to become a fighting, screaming, struggling mass.
Police and firemen had to fight their way through the mad tide of humanity to reach the injured. Many of them unconscious, who were being trampled on the floors of the cars. Other firemen quickly extinguished the blaze, the danger of which had added additional impetus to the panic.
The elevated train had stopped on a signal just outside the 167th street station to allow a preceding subway train to clear when the following subway train came around the curve in the tracks to plow into its wooden rear coaches. Some witnesses said the subway train was not going over 10 miles an hour at the time of the crash.

The Bee Danville Virginia 1929-04-29

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