Bordentown, NJ Train Collision, Feb 1901

A DISASTROUS WRECK ON THE PENNSYLVANIA.

TEN KILLED AND AT LEAST TWENTY-FIVE INJURED IN NEW JERSEY COLLISION.

VICTIMS ARE CONSTRUCTION MEN.

THE "NELLY BLY" EXPRESS AND A PASSENGER TRAIN COME TOGETHER NEAR TRENTON -- BOTH WERE RUNNING AT FULL SPEED.

Trenton, N. J., Feb 23. -- One of the worst collisions in the history of the Amboy division of the Pennsylvania railroad occurred at about 5:30 o'clock last night at Ruslings Siding, near Bordentown, and about eight miles south of Trenton.
"The Nellie Bly" express from New York for Atlantic City collided with passenger train No. 330, running from Camden to Trenton.
The number of dead so far known is ten, and the injured upward of twenty-five.
A special train at about 9 o'clock from the scene of the wreck brought four dead bodies and eighteen wounded persons to Trenton. The wounded were distributed among the three Trenton hospitals. Other wounded passengers were taken to Cooper hospital at Camden. Among the killed was WALTER EARL, engineer of the express, and JAMES BIRMINGHAM, baggagemaster of the local train. Most of the killed were Italians.
FRANK BOLAND, a passenger of No. 330, had both legs cut off. He will probably die.
MICHAEL McGREW, fireman on the "Nellie Bly," was badly injured, but is expected to recover.
FRANK THOMPSON, engineer of No. 330, has a leg broken and is badly bruised.
EDWARD GARWOOD, fireman of No. 330, was badly bruised by jumping, but will recover.
EDWARD SAPP, conductor of No. 330, was also injured, but his wounds are not believed to be serious.
Most of the remaining dead and injured are Italians. The Italians were riding in the smoking car of the express train. They were being taken to Atlantic City to do construction work for the railroad company.
The scene at the wreck is desceibed by those who were present as horrifying. The two trains collided at full speed and both engines were completely demolished. The forward car of each train, in both instances a combination baggage and smoker, were entirely demolished also, and to add to the horror the wreckage took fire. The second car of the "Nellie Bly" turned over on its side and the passengers had to climb out through the windows. In this they were assisted by passengers from the cars that did not leave the rails. The track at this point is so close to the Delaware and Raritan canal that the passengers in getting out of the overturned coach got into the canal and many of the bodies of the dead and injured had to be taken from the water.
THOMAS LAWRENCE of Trenton said he saw one man buried beneath the ruins and crying for assistance. He tried to pry him out, but found he could do nothing to help him. He believes the man perished in the flames. The scene of the wreck was far from outside assistance. When the wrecking train arrived from Trenton it was after dark and the work of clearing up the debris and moving the bodies was necessiarily slow.
The "Nellie Bly" was running in three sections, and it was the third section with which No. 330 collided. The local train had taken the siding to permit the express to pass, and it is believed that through some misunderstanding or mistake the local came out on the main track after the second section had passed, mistaking it for the third section.

The Milford Mail Iowa 1901-02-28

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