Roebling, NJ Trolley Collision, May 1921

JERSEY TROLLEY MAN BURNS TO DEATH IN WRECK.

CONDUCTOR TRAPPED BENEATH FLAMING DEBRIS AS TWO CARS OF TRENTON-CAMDEN LINE CRASH NEAR ROEBLING.

FORTY PASSENGERS INJURED.

WOMEN FAINT AS VICTIM PRAYS AND BEGS HELP RESCUERS CANNOT GIVE.

Roebling, N.J., May 30. -- Two trolley cars on the Trenton-Camden line crashed head-on half a mile from here shortly after 3 o'clock this afternoon. CHARLES CONKLIN, of Beverly, a conductor employed by the Public Service Railways, was killed and nearly two score passengers were injured.
CONKLIN'S clothing caught when a short circuited wire set fire to one of the cars, and he was burned to death before passengers could reach him. Motormen of both cars escaped with slight injuries. Most of the injured were able to leave the City Hospital after receiving treatment for bruises, lacerations and minor injuries.
A list of the more seriously injured includes:
MRS. WALTER SMITH, of Far Hills, N.J., two ribs and left arm broken and possible internal injuries. Her condition is said to be serious.
ANNA L. ROWE, of 194 Arlington Avenue, Jersey City, right hand broken, one finger cut off and injuries about the legs.
HATTIE GLOVER, of 350 Rosemont Avenue, internal injuries.
HENRY KELLERMAN, of 568 East State Street, Trenton, legs severely cut.
MRS. HENRY KELLERMAN, his wife, legs burned.
MARTIN HEGAN, of 251 Ashmore Street, Trenton, legs and arms cut.
HELEN ANDREWS, of 863 Revere Avenue, Trenton, eyes and legs injured.
JOHN McKENZIE, of Burger, N.J., legs and arms burned.
WARRINGTON ROWE, of 309 Washington Street, Bristol, Pa., right leg broken.
FREDERICK HERRICK, of Palmyra, conductor on the northbound car, scalp badly torn.
WILLIAM HARRISON, of Florence, N.J., right leg broken and left arm cut.
JOSEPH WILLIAMSON, of 57 Bismark Avenue, Trenton, N.J., scalp torn.
The cause of the accident is being investigated by officials of the Public Service Railways Company and Coroner Belton, of Burlington County. The Trenton-Camden line is a single track system, with switches at regular intervals to permit north and southbound traffic to pass. According to officials of the railway company, the southbound car, of which CONKLIN was the conductor, should have been waiting at the Roebling switch for the northbound car to pass. Instead of this, it was proceding south at a low rate of speed in the single track block about half a mile from this place.

Continued on Page 2.