Waterford, NJ Automobile Wreck, Nov 1912

FAINTS AT AUTO WHEEL, SEVEN HURT, 4 FATALLY.

DRIVER BARELY HAD STRENGTH TO SET BRAKE, BUT COULDN"T SHUT OFF POWER.

MACHINE TURNS TURTLE.

VICTIMS PINNED UNDER CAR AND SKULLS CRUSHED -- BLOCKING OF WHEELS CAUSED AXLE TO BREAK.

Camden, N.J., Nov. 17. -- Four persons were so badly hurt in an automobile accident at Waterford twenty miles east of this city, today that no hope is held out for their recovery while three others who were in the machine were badly hurt.
WILLIAM BROWN, of Spring City, Penn., who was driving the car, was taken with a fainting spell while going at high speed. His foot struck the brake, but as the engine was not cut off the rear axle broke and the car turned turtle.
Those in the car with BROWN were his mother, MRS. ELLA BROWN, whose skull was fractured;
MRS. KATE WRIGHT, ANNA BROWN and ESTHER BROWN, all of whom are said to be fatally injured; MARY WRIGHT and WILLIAM WRIGHT, who with BROWN are expected to recover. All of those injured are in the Cooper Hospital in this city, where they were brought in another automobile.
MISS ANNA BROWN, who has been living in Atlantic City, had been on a two weeks' visit to Spring City. Her brother, who is a prominent business man at that place, offered to take his sister home in his car and invited other members of the family to go along for a day's outing.
BROWN was severely injured about the head by a fall ten years ago and ever since has been subject to fainting spells. He was running the car rapidly along the White Horse Pike when he felt that one of his spells was coming on. He made an attempt to stop the car before he was overcome and jammed his foot down on the brake, but neglected to shut off the power.
Instantly the car turned over and all of its occupants were thrown into the road, the heavy machine falling upon four of them and crushing their skulls. The others fell clear of the machine and were badly hurt.
All of the party except WILLIAM WRIGHT and his sister MARY were unconscious when another motor car came along and picked them up.

New York Tribune New York 1912-11-18