Camden, NJ Plane Crashes, Nov 1931

FIVE KILLED AS AIR LINER FALLS AT CAMDEN, N.J.

NEW YORK TO WASHINGTON AIRPLANE CRASHES ON GOLF COURSE NEAR AIRPORT; OCCUPANTS BURNED TO DEATH.

Camden, N.J., Nov. 6. (AP) -- Five men, two pilots and three passengers, were burned to death when a Newark to Washington passenger airliner, maneuvering for a landing at the Camden Airport, last night, plummeted into the soft turf of a nearby golf course and burst into flames.
Something went wrong -- an investigation today hoped to fix the responsibility -- and the plane dropped like lead, its nose burying itself in two feet of earth. Flames wrapped about the wrecked liner as it struck the earth, driving back hundreds of persons who sped to the rescue of the crash victims. Terrific heat made rescue work impossible and the bodies of the victims could not be reached until the Pensauken fire department had extinguished the flames.

Veteran Pilot.
At the controls of the ship was FLOYD COX, a veteran flier with more than 3,000 hours flying experience. In the cabin behind were VERNON LUCAS, a fellow pilot going back to his Washington home after a flight to New York; ELMER SMITH, advertising manager of the Washington Herald; GEORGE B. TAYLOR, director of the laboratory division of the Chestnut Farms Dairy in Washington, and FRANCIS R. EHLE, of Riverton, N.J., president of the International Resistence Company.
All were burned beyond recognition, although none was crushed. COX had his hand on the stick, apparently having died desperately striving to save the lives of himself and his charges.
At the airport was MRS. BLANCH EHLE, awaiting the return of her husband from a business trip to New York. She and EHLE planned to hurry home to Riverton where a small son and daughter awaited "daddy's" arrival to start dinner. When the plane crashed, MRS. EHLE screamed and fainted.
One witness maintained the plane flopped over before it dived. The ground keeper of the golf club, who was present, and was the first to reach the blazing wreckage, asserted the motor stopped and the plane went like a bullet toward the green.

Kingsport Times Tennessee 1931-11-06