Trenton, NJ Famous Aviator Dies, Oct 1912

Charles Walsh circa 1910.jpg Charles Walsh in flight.jpg Charles F. Walsh in flight May 1912.jpg

50,000 SEE FLIER FALL TO HIS DEATH.

AVIATOR CHARLES F. WALSH KILLED IN 2,000-FOOT PLUNGE AT TRENTON FAIR.

MACHINE LANDS IN A TREE.

RESCUING PHYSICIANS HAVE TO CLIMB IT TO REACH LIMP BODY -- THE 193d FATALITY.

Special to The New York Times.
Trenton, N.J., Oct. 3. -- With women fainting and men turning their heads away that they might not see, CHARLES F. WALSH, an aviator, plunged to his death in the presence of more than 50,000 persons at the Inter-State Fair here late this afternoon. He fell a distance of 2,000 feet, breaking every bone in his body and only living a few moments after his fall.
WALSH, who was only about 25 years old, had been startling the fair crowds all week with his daring flying, in which he not only raced an automobile around a half-mile track, but also made sensational "dip of death" descents from high altitudes.
He soared upward nearly 4,000 feet today, then came down half way to earth and began his circling glide. Scarcely had he begun it when a wing of his frail machine collapsed and he, with his craft, commenced falling to the ground. A gasp of horror went up from the army of spectators, and then a hush fell upon the multitude. He landed about half a mile outside the inclosure in a tree, and there was a stampede to the spot. He died shortly after doctors got to him. The physicians had to climb the tree to reach him, hanging limp in his wrecked machine. There was a scramble among men, women, and children for souvenirs of the tragedy, and little was left of the aeroplane when the crowd finished its work.
WALSH was taught flying by Lincoln Beachy, and Mrs. Beachy accompanied him this afternoon in an automobile ride before the grand stand. He was a native of San Diego, Cal., was married, and is survived by his widow and two small children. His family lives at Hammondsport, N.Y. Beachy took charge of the body. WALSH was to have begun his vacation in two days.

New York Times New York 1912-10-04

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