Atlantic City, NJ Steamer Cherokee Sinking, Jan 1906

SIXTY SAFELY LANDED FROM STEAMER CHEROKEE

Thousands Cheer Rescues by Atlantic City Schooner Alberta.

SHIP PROBABLY IS DOOMED

Captain, Two Mates, and Carpenter Still on Board---A Stewardess Praised for Bravery.

Special to The New York Times.

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Jan. 14.---The passengers and crew of the Clyde Line steamer Cherokee, aground on Brigantine Shoals since Friday last, are safe ashore to-night with the life savers who were imprisoned on the steamer with them. Sixty in all came ashore at 5 o'clock this afternoon. Capt. Archibald, two mates, and the ship's carpenter elected to stay on the stranded steamer.

The Cherokee seems doomed. All day she has been pounding hard against the shoal. She is a mile nearer shore, and the chances to-night are that next Summer she will be an attraction, instead of a steamship. Another twenty-four hours of driving will put her where she may be reached by small boats when calm Summer seas prevail.

The rescue was effected by volunteers from here after the chance of saving those aboard seemed to be growing slim, unless the Sandy Hook Life Savers arrived in time. It was known that they were coming down the coast with their unsinkable boat in tow of a tug, but to the ten thousand watchers on the piers and shore it seemed as if the hours that must elapse before they could arrive would see the wreck split open. Every wave this afternoon broke over the ship and at times the waves rolled to the top of the smokestack. Hours before the rescue the waves had washed out the fires and the hold began to fill with water.

Capt. Mark Casto and a volunteer crew put in the schooner Alberta., which in Summer is used to take our excursionists. The attempt to use the Alberta had been discussed, but seemed almost foolhardy, and it was postponed. But when those willing to man the schooner saw that the Cherokee had listed so that her starboard side was awash they started.

As they went out over the inlet bar they were cheered. Capt. Casto was lashed to the wheel to prevent his being washed overboard, and the men with him, who were to man the sheets, were lashed fast at their posts. All were provided with life belts.

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