Jersey City, NJ Business Section Fire, June 1865

EXTENSIVE CONFLAGRATION IN JERSEY CITY -- SEVERAL MANUFACTORIES BURNED DOWN -- LOSS ABOUT ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS.

Shortly after 10 o'clock yesterday forenoon, a fire broke out on the fourth floor of the American Drug Mills, located on the corner of Washington and Morgan streets, Jersey City. The flames spread rapidly, and in less than twenty minutes the entire building -- a five-story brick structure -- was enveloped in flames, and the fireman were unable to save the building. The workmen in the upper stories barely escaped with their lives, several of them descending to the ground by means of the lightning rod. There are also rumors that two or three persons lost their lives, but as far as can be ascertained the rumor is without foundation. The building was owned by D. S. GREGORY, JR., & Co., whose loss will probably reach $70,000, said to be covered by insurance in New York companies.
The Horseshoe Company's building, adjoining, owned by a joint stock company, of which MR. COLGATE is President, was demolished by the falling walls. Loss about $7,000; insured for $3,000 each in the Star and Manhattan Insurance Companies, New York.
The New York Railroad Chair Works, adjoining the American Mills, on Morgan street, were damaged to the amount of about $1,000; insured in the Jersey City Company.
From thence the fire crossed Washington street and the flames communicated to the car manufactory of MESSRS. CUMMINGS & Son, which was also destroyed. This was a large brick building erected on the side of the car shops, which were burned last Fall. MR. CUMMINGS' loss is about $10,000, insured in the AEtna for $3,000 and in other companies. The fire was stayed at the car shop, and the O.K. soap factory adjoining it on Morgan street. The latter building was owned by J. C. & J. EDGE, and was occupied by LITTELL & Co. as a soap factory. MESSRS. EDGE lose $4,500, insured for $2,000 in the Jersey City Fire Insurance Company, and LITTLE & Co.'s loss is about $2,500. The total loss will not vary much from $100,000. The origin of the fire is not definitely known, but is supposed to have been caused by the sudden combustion of a mass of brimstone by coming in contact with some metallic substance while it was being ground in the mill. The firemen worked nobly, and by their untiring exertions prevented a much greater destruction of property.

The New York Times New York 1865-06-29