Duluth, MN (Lake Superior) Steamers THOMAS WILSON and GEORGE HADLEY Collide, June 1902

GEORGE HADLEY.jpg THOMAS WILSON.jpg THOMAS WILSON 2.jpg

VESSEL LOST WITH NINE MEN.

COLLISION OF STEAMERS ON LAKE SUPERIOR TODAY IS ATTENDED BY THE ABOVE RESULTS.

(By Associated Press.)
Duluth, Minn., June 7. -- The whaleback steamer Thomas Wilson, Captain CAMERON, master, was cut almost in two by the steamer George Hadley, Captain FITZGERALD, master, a half mile south of the Duluth canal today, and nine men went down. They were mostly men of the night crew who had not time to get out of their bunks before the vessel went to the bottom.
The names of the men lost are:
AARON TRIPP, cook.
J. FRANK, second cook, Superior.
JAMES McDOUGAL, oiler, West Superior.
JAMES M. FRASER, oiler, Manitou Island.
JOSEPH McGRAW, wheelsman, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
JOHN CAMPBELL, lookout, Greenleaf, Mich.
JOHN CAREY, deck hand, St. Cartherines, Ont.
THOMAS JONES, deck hand.
WILLIAM ROEBUCK, fireman, Port Hampton.
The Wilson was coming toward the canal and the Hadley was going out. Both were loaded. Just before reaching the canal and when about opposite the Wilson, the Hadley was given orders by a tug to go to Superior. Immediately she sheered off for the Superior entry and crashed directly into the Wilson.
The Wilson went down so quickly that it did not seem possible to save a life. One moment the two boats were plowing through the water two hundred yards apart, the next the crew of the Wilson could be seen throwing off their clothing and jumping into the water. One man on the Wilson seemed to have more presence of mind than all the rest. He threw life preservers to those that jumped in the cold water without thinking and he certainly saved some lives. The crew of the Hadley also threw preservers to the men struggling in the water.
Immediately after the collision the Wilson pitched forward and went down. As she plunged, the crew that was still undressing rushed to the stern jumping overboard as fast they could free themselves from their clothing. The Wilson did not live a minute after the collision.
While she was on top of the water she seemed to be supported entirely by the Hadley's prow, which was sticking in through her plates. The plunge of the Wilson released the Hadley and the latter boat swung back with a tremendous jerk. As the whaleback went beneath the water, she spouted like a submarine explosion from the compression of air in her.

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