Browder, KY Coal Mine Explosion, Feb 1910

Birth, Marriage & Death Records

Browder Mine KY Disaster 1910

10 DEAD; 17 ENTOMBED.

VICTIMS OF EXPLOSION IN KENTUCKY COAL MINE.

HUNDRED IN SHAFT AT TIME.

OTHERS ENABLED TO GET TO ELEVATOR AND ESCAPE.

Drakesboro, Ky., Feb. 2 -- Ten men are known to be dead and seventeen others are missing presumed to be penned up in entries by falls of state as a result of a gas explosion in the Browder mine 1 1/2 miles from Drakesboro at noon today.
At 8 o'clock tonight eight of the bodies had been recovered all mutilated and some past identification.
Because of the accumulation of gases in the entry where the explosion occurred 170 feet beneath the ground and 200 feet back from the mine shaft. It was impossible to begin active rescue work until six hours after the disaster occurred.
There were 100 men in the mine at the time of the explosion more than half of them in the west entry. All of them hastened to the cages and were quickly drawn to the top except the unfortunate 27.
As soon as it was safe to begin with the rescue work miners were sent down in relays. It is feared all the men entombed are dead.

Washington Post District of Columbia 1910-02-02

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THIRTY-THREE KNOWN KILLED.

TWO MISSING AND FIFTEEN INJURED AS RESULT OF EXPLOSION IN KENTUCKY MINE.

ABOUT HALF OF VICTIMS AMERICANS.

ONE HUNDRED MEN WERE AT WORK IN THE MINE AT THE TIME, BUT FIFTY IN THE WEST WING ESCAPED UNINJURED -- SOME OF THE BODIES SO MUTILATED AS TO BE UNRECOGNIZABLE.

Drakesboro, Ky., Feb. 2. -- Thirty-three miners are known to have been killed, two are missing and fifteen are injured as a result of the explosion in the Browder coal mine, near here, yesterday. There were one hundred men in the two wings of the mine at the time of the explosion, but the fifty men in the west wing were uninjured and escaped.
Those in the east wing felt the full force of the explosion. One or two of the injured are in a critical condition. Of the dead about half were whites, all Americans, and the remainder negroes.
PETER KELLY, mine foreman, is among the missing.
As a result of the disaster all of the mines in the vicinity closed down today, the men offering their services in rescue work.
The explosion is believed to have been caused by a miner's lamp igniting gas in an unused room. The force of the explosion was apparently sufficient to cause instant death to all the men in the eastern wing where it occurred. Cars and heavy timbers were blown about like kindling wood.
Within a few minutes after the first news of the explosion the inhabitants of the little mining town were crowding about the shaft. Women and children crazed with grief, pleaded with those in charge of the mine for news of the of the entombed men.

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