Various Towns, IL, IN Tornadoes, Apr 1922

32 LIVES LOST IN YESTERDAY'S WIND STORMS.

SEVERAL HUNDRED PERSONS INJURED AND PROPERTY LOSS RUNS INTO THE MILLIONS.

INDIANA HARDEST HIT.

VILLAGE OF HEDRICK ALMOST WIPED OUT -- ALEXANDRIA SUFFERS HEAVILY.

Chicago, Ill., April 18. -- Revised figures on the casualties and damage caused by the storms which have swept over the central states yesterday and last night indicated at noon today that the loss of life would not be as great as had been expected. The latest figures showed thirty-two known dead -- thirteen in Illinois, seventeen in Indiana and two in Missouri -- three to four hundred injured and property damage running into millions of dollars.
Accompanied by rains which sent streams, then swollen, coursing far beyond their usual channels, the storm brought added suffering and inconvenience to communities which for several days have been affected by flood conditions. A drop in the temperature to below the seasonal normal added to the discomfort of families whose homes having been destroyed by wind or made uninhibitable by flood are now living in tents or improvised shelter.
Missouri, Iowa and Kansas had felt the storm early Sunday, but in three states it lacked the intensity which marked its sweep across Illinois and Indiana and into Ohio.
As it passed over Indiana there were two distinct tornado belts. The one in the southern part sustained some damage, but across the northern part of the state there was a wind swept strip in which the loss of life was heavy.
The death toll was greatest in central Illinois. The villages of Irvington and Plainfield, near Centralia, were badly wrecked and several persons were killed. Wires were blown down by the wind and telephone and telegraph companies hurried today to complete repairs.

VILLAGE ALMOST DESTROYED.

TEN DEAD IN AND NEAR HEDRICK -- SOME TRICKS OF THE WIND.

Danville, Ill., April 18. -- Ten persons are known to have been killed and 41 injured, several probably fatally, in a cyclone which swept across Champaign and Vermillion counties, Illinois, and Warren county, Indiana, late yesterday afternoon, doing damage estimated at a quarter of a million dollars.
The little village of Hedrick, Ind., was almost wiped out. Four houses and two churches, comprising a group known as Pleasant View Corner, were razed, and on the ULRICH HUNTER farm, five miles north of West Lebanon, Ind., three houses and many farm buildings were destroyed.
The following list of dead was compiled here:
MRS. ALBERT G. ANDERSON, Ogden, Ill.
GROVER JACKSON, Hedrick, Ind.
WILLIAM GRADY, Hedrick, Ind.
GRACE GRADY, Hedrick, Ind.
MRS. PHILIP HIGH, east of Hedrick, Ind.
MRS. JOHN MARSIE, on the HUNTER farm.
FLORENCE KUNTZ, 14, on the HUNTER farm.
PAUL GRITTON, six, east of Hedrick.
RUTH GRITTON, aged three months, east of Hedrick.
GOLDIE SMITH, 17, Hedrick.
Many of the seriously injured and others not so badly hurt were brought to Danville hospitals for treatment. Danville doctors were called to the storm center after it was reported and worked through the night.
MRS. ETTA HURLEY, who with her 16 year old daughter was alone in her home at Hedrick, was stripped of her dress, but only slightly injured.
The ten months old child of JAMES DOWNEY was blown from the house into a garden and deposited in the soft mud unhurt.
A garage was demolished by the storm at Fithian, Ill., and an automobile carried nearly a quarter of a mile and dropped in a pasture. A barn on the SCOTT PAGE farm was lifted and carried away, but the horses were left standing uninjured.
The barn at the home of THORNTON BAGLER was turned around on its foundation, but remains standing and is little damaged

INDIANA HEAVILY HIT.

TWO AREAS HIT BY TORNADOES WHICH TOOK AT LEAST 16 LIVES.

Indianapolis, April 18. -- Western and central Indiana today were slowly recovering from the tornado which took at least sixteen lives and injured more than 300.
The little village of Hedrick was virtually destroyed, and a national guard company was patrolling the city to prevent pillaging of houses and business houses which were brought down by the high winds. Ten are known to be dead in that place and more than 100 injured.
At Williamsport three persons are dead and more than fifty injured. Many buildings there were laid to ruins by the high winds, which were accompanied by heavy rains.
Alexandria, in the central part of the state, reported three dead and many injured from the storm which struck there late in the afternoon.
Communication with the stricken towns was still impossible this morning. Railroad traffic in Indiana was delayed today because of the washouts which yesterday compelled several lines to abandon service.
Officials in the stricken areas declined to estimate the amount of damage, but it was believed it would run beyond $1,000,000.
White river was reported to be receding by weather bureau officials today. Many rivers and streams in Indiana which yesterday reached the flood stage today were reported to have left their banks and spread over the surrounding country, but it is believed that they will begin to recede within twenty four hours should clear weather prevail.
Fair weather with probable frosts tonight was forecast by weather officials.

ANOTHER DEAD AT ALEXANDRIA.
Anderson, Ind., April 18. -- The death list from the tornado that swept over a twelve mile course in the north part of Madison county last evening, destroying fifty homes at Orestes and north of Alexandria and causing a property loss of $100,000, was increased to three today when MRS. MOLLIE EPITIGRAPP, 50 years old, died at an Alexandria hospital from her injuries. JOHN RIDER, hired man for RICHARD GOODMAN, who was killed in the storm, and the eleven year old daughter of MRS. EPITIGRAPP are still missing and searchers expect to find their bodies.
At least ten persons were injured in the storm.
Arrival of clear skies today enabled those engaged in rescue work to see that the real extent of the Madison county cyclone was worse than reported in press dispatches last night. A number of the most beautiful country homes near Alexandria were wrecked by the wind, which wrought havoc along a twelve mile path starting north of Elwood and continuing north and eastward towards Delaware county. Although the death list is expected to reach five with the discovery of the missing, none of the known injured are expected to die.

Kokomo Tribune Indiana 1922-04-18

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