Cartersville, GA Iron Mine Cave In, Oct 1904

HALF DOZEN BURIED UNDER FALLING EARTH.

BODIES OF R. P. MORGAN AND FIVE OTHERS ARE MANGLED.

SLICK HEAD CAUSES TERRIBLE ACCIDENT.

ACCIDENT OCCURRED AT THE PLANT OF THE MORGAN MINING COMPANY, NEAR CARTERSVILLE -- SEVERAL BODIES ARE RECOVERED, AND TWO ARE MISSING.

Cartersville, Ga., October 3. -- (Special.) -- At the Morgan Mining Company's iron mine, near this city, this morning a large cave-in of dirt and ore occurred, covering with its mighty weight six men, only two of which have as yet been recovered alive.
The president of the company and manager of the mine, MR. R. P. MORGAN, was among the victims, his lifeless body being recovered fearfully mashed and disfigured.
The scene of the accident was a cut about 100 feet deep and 100 feet in a hill and the time was about 9:30 o'clock. A blast had just been made at the end of the cut and a large mass of dirt and ore had fallen in.
MR. MORGAN, just arrived, was talking with his men, who were getting ready to move the ore. There were five men besides MR. MORGAN. WILLIAM WHEELER, a miner who stood near the mouth of the cut, saw a shaking in the side wall of the cut and yelled to the men to look out.
Just then the side fell in, burying all those in the cut beneath it.
MR. WHEELER telephoned at once to Emerson and Cartersville for help and soon men and physicians were on the scene working to rescue the men. Thirty hands from the Kelley and sixty from the Barton mine hurried to the place and farmers from around the mine.
After a few hours' work two negroes nearest the edge of the cut were rescued. They were alive, but may die. Their names are WRIGHT MILNER and AL BUFORD. The former had one leg broken in four places and the latter had a leg broken in two places.
At 11:50 the body of MR. MORGAN was recovered. It was found in rather stooping posture behind and partly over a small tram car. The tram
car was broken to splinters. MR. MORGAN'S body was terribly crushed and mangled. His head was right against the side of the cut. His neck was broken. His arm was broken and crushed, his leg broken and his body about the region of the stomach badly bruised and lacerated.
The fall of ore and dirt was what was known as a "slick head" coming without special cause or warning. A heavy strata of ore lay above a mass of clay, and the latter gave way, the former toppled and the whole mass went down. The falling wall was the one opposite where the men were standing. There were 1,000 tons weight, it is estimated, in the mass that fell.
The death of MR. MORGAN causes a great pall to hang over the community where he was a favorite with all. His gentlemanly bearing and sunny, gental nature won for him the friendship of all he came in contact with. He with other young men opened this mine two years ago that had been quite profitable. A dummy line carried the ore to the M. and A., a mile, and a half, at Emerton.
The other men buried under the debris are JIM HARRIS, JR., white; ROBERT BOYTON, colored, and another colored hand.
Their bodies will be reached by the workers at about 12 o'clock tonight, it is supposed.

Atlanta Constitution Georgia 1904-10-04

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Cartersville, Ga. Iron Mine Cave In, Oct. 1904

William Wheeler (William W. Wheeler) mentioned in the article is my ggg-grandfather. He was born and lived his life in Emerson and worked at and supervised at other mines in the area as well. I have a good photo of him. There was a mine in Emerson named the "Wheeler Mine" (an ocher mine) not because they had any ownership but because it was a stones throw from W.W.'s parents home and farm (William D. Wheeler) .