Coastal AK, Steamer PRINCESS SOPHIA Sinks, Oct 1918

Birth, Marriage & Death Records

Princess Sophia Circa 1913 Princess Sophia Before Breaking Apart BRIT COL Princess Sophia 10-25-1918.jpg BRIT COL Steamer Princess Sophia 10-25-1918.jpg

FLAGS AT HALF MAST -- ALASKA MOURNS FOR CITIZENS WHO WENT DOWN IN STORM.

BODIES STREW SHORE -- RELIEF SHIPS SCOURING WATERS FOR VICTIMS OF PRINCESS SOPHIA.

Juneau, Alaska, Oct. 28 -- Shores near the scene of the wreck of the Princess Sophia are strewn with dead bodies, according to wireless messages received here last night from vessels, scouring the waters near where the boat went down.
A heavy storm yesterday prevented the relief ships from getting to the land.
Bodies of twelve victims were brought here today. Ten were identified as follows:
A. W. KENDALL.
MRS. A. H. BRIDGES.
AMY HALL.
J. R. YOUNG.
EDWARD G. WHEELDON.
HARRY A. RUTHERFORD.
HENRY BRADLEY.
HENRY B. PERKINS.
GEORGE W. BOOTH.
Captain FRANK GOSSIE.
Two were unidentified.
No word of any survivors of the Sophia have reached here. Governor Thomas Riggs, Jr., of Alaska, who is at Lynn canal, where the Sophia went down, has taken personal charge of the rescue work.
Over twenty-five boats yesterday were reported searching for bodies.

Flags At Half Mast.
All flags throughout Alaska were ordered by Governor Riggs yesterday to be put at half mast in memory of the Sophia's victims.
Inquiries came here from all parts of the territory asking about various Alaskans who were bound out to the states and who were expected to leave Skagway at about the time the Sophia sailed.
Watches on the bodies brought here were stopped at ten minutes of seven. This was taken here to mean that the Sophia went down at about that time Saturday morning. Earlier reports said she sank late Friday night.

150 Bodies Found.
Seattle, Wash., Oct. 28. -- With their task almost half completed, searchers are continuing search for bodies of those believed lost when the Canadian Pacific Railway company's passenger steamer Princess Sophia, was sunk by a storm Friday night.
One hundred and fifty bodies were recovered by last night, according to dispatches sent from the north by a British Columbia wireless service. A small fleet of boats led by the United States lighthouse tender Cedar is making the search.

Princess Alice Searching.
The Princess Alice, a sister ship of the Princess Sohpia, arrived at the scene of the wreck yesterday, it was thought here today. When the Alice left Vancouver for the north Thursday it was thought she would arrive Sunday to take off the passengers and crew of the Sophia. Instead, the Alice will come back as a ship of the dead.
According to a wireless from the Cedar 343 persons were aboard the Sophia. Lists sent from Skagway and Vancouver placed the total of around 335. It was thought that several joined the crew at the last moment and were not on the Skagway and Vancouver lists.

Bodies of Officers Found.
Seattle, Wash., Oct. 28. -- J. R. YOUNG, whose body was brought to Juneau, was chief engineer of the boat between Yukon and Dawson. He reside in Yukon. Captain FRANK GOSSIE whose body was also found was second officer of the Sophia. MRS. A. H. BRIDGES, another recovered, was the wife of the proprietor of the Yukonia restaurant of Dawson, Y.T. HARRY RUTHERFORD was a waiter on the river steamer Casca. E. G. WHEELDON was a deckhand on the steamer Selkirk. HENRY B. PERKINS was the general manager of the Pacific Coast Cold Storage company. His home was here.

Eighteen Bodies Found.
Victoria, B.C., Oct. 28. -- Eighteen bodies, seventeen men and a boy, from the wreck of the Princess Sophia have been taken to Juneau, Alaska, according to a wireless message received here from the U.S.S. Cedar. The bodies were found floating near the spot where the Sophia went down. No identification was given.

The Ogden Standard Ogden City Utah 1918-10-28

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STEAMSHIP PRINCESS SOPHIA SINKS.

Seattle, Wash., Oct. 28. -- With their task almost half completed, searchers today continued seeking bodies of the 343 persons believed lost when the Canadian Pacific Railway Company's passenger steamer Princess Sophia was sent by a storm Friday night to the bottom of the Lynn canal, half-way between Juneau and Skagway, Alaska points on the Inside passage.
One hundred and fifty bodies were recovered by last night, according to a despatch sent from the north by a British Columbia wireless service. The wireless did not state if any were identified. A small fleet of boats, led by the United States lighthouse tender Cedar, is making the search.
JOHN F. PUGH, collector of customs for the Alaska district, is one of the well known Alaskans who went to his death, leaving a wife, daughter, mother and sister here.
Four members of the United States signal corps, en route from For Gibbons were lost. They were:
I. LABRIE.
GEORGE R. HENDIX of Terre Haute, Ind.
A. W. McQUEEN.
T. E. SANDFORD.
All were connected with the operation of the government's Alaska cable.
G. F. MAYHOOD, miner and prospector of the Ruby district, who after years of struggling had gathered enough wealth to return to his home in San Francisco and live in comfort for the rest of his life, went down with the ship. He has a son living in San Francisco.
WILLIAM SCOUZE, one of the best known old time prospectors in this territory, and who was one of the first locators on El Dorado Creek in 1896, was another passenger aboard the Sophia.

San Francisco, Oct. 28. -- In the list of passengers lost on the wrecked Princess Sophia appears the name of S. J. BAGGERLY of Ruby, Alaska. BAGGERLY was the manager of the Alaska Commercial Company of Ruby, Fairbanks and Dawson.
He is a brother of HYLAND BAGGERLY, former San Francisco newspaper man, now publisher of the San Jose News, and of MRS. FREMONT OLDER. He is a former San Franciscan.
His wife also was a passenger on the Princess Sophia, and is believed to have been lost with her husband.

Vancouver, B.C., Oct. 28. -- C. E. WATSON and GEORGE RANDOLPH, prominent mining men from Eastern Canada, were lost on the Sophia. WATSON was the manager of a mining corporation and RANDOLPH was a mining expert. They came to Vancouver some time ago to purchase machinery for a mine.

Oakland Tribune California 1918-10-28