Eufaula, AL Train Wreck, Nov 1913

13 DEAD, 100 HURT IN ALABAMA WRECK

Broken Rail Causes Three Crowded Coaches to Leave the Track and Dash Over Steep Embankment.

Eufaula, Ala., November 13 - Thirteen persons were killed and more than a hundred injured, some of them fatally, early today when three coaches of a Central of Georgia passenger train left the rails at a point seventeen miles south of here and plunged down a steep embankment. The train, which consisted of five cars crowded with excursionists, was en route from Ozark, Ala., to Eufaula, where a fair is being held. The identified dead are:

The Dead.
POMP OUTSEY, Clayton, Ala.
MONROE FLOYD, Clayton, Ala.
MISS BONNIE BROCK, Clio, Ala.
Son of CURB BELL, Clayton, Ala.
MISS ANNIE WILKERSON, Clio, Ala.
MRS. WILBUR M'LEAN, Clio, Ala.
MRS. ALTO ADAMS, Elamville, Ala.
ZACK PEEK, Clayton, Ala.
LOIS BROCK, Clio, Ala.
JOHN GLOVER, Clio, Ala.
MAUDE M'REA, negro, Clio, Ala.
________ BROWN, negro, Clio, Ala.
SAM UNDERWOOD, negro, Clayton, Ala.

Fatally Injured.
The fatally injured are:
WASH McREA, Clio, previously reported dead.
MRS. J. W. KENDRICK, Clayton.
IRENE ROUNDTREE, aged 2, Louisville, Ala.
ALBERT LEWIS, Clio, Ala.
WILLIAM TEAL, Clio, Ala.
MISS LAURA WILKERSON, Clio, Ala.
LENNIE FRYER, negro, Clio, Ala.

Among those who escaped with minor injuries was JEFFERSON D. CLAYTON, a wealthy Alabamian and brother of United States Representative HENRY D. CLAYTON, of this state.

A broken rail is said to have been the cause of the accident. As the crowded excursion train rounded a curve the three cars at the rear, literally packed with passengers, suddenly left the track, and, breaking away from the others, dashed down the steep embankment. The wrecked coaches were practically demolished. Shrieks and groans of the injured rose above the rending crash of splintering timbers.

The Work of Rescue.
Occupants of the two coaches which remained on the rails immediately bent their efforts to rescuing the hundreds who were caught in the tangled mass of wreckage. Word of the disaster quickly reached Clayton, Ala., three miles away, and relief trains, bearing nurses and surgeons, were quickly dispatched from Ozark and Eufaula, where most of the dead and injured later were taken.

Many of the victims were cared for at Clayton, where the citizens turned their residences into emergency hospitals. Every physician within a radius of many miles hurried to the scene of the wreck and assisted in caring for the wounded. So large was the number of victims, however, that available space at Clayton soon was exhausted, and many had to be placed on cots on porches and in front yards.

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